Hotspots: June 2022’s Top Trends Observations

Hotspots brings you the Mintel Trends team’s top observations on product and service launches from around the world. From a gaming glossary that gives a greater context to abbreviations and terms to herbal supplements, find out the most innovative global initiatives happening this month.

Gamers Get It- North America

The PlayStation Ultimate Gaming Glossary defines 109 gaming-related terms to help people better understand gaming culture and the consoles themselves. The dictionary defines and links to related terms, with occasional gameplay images for reference.

The gaming industry spans across genres and demographics, with subcultures emerging with their own slang that may be incomprehensible to outsiders or new gamers. PlayStation’s Gaming Glossary is intended for both experienced and novice gamers alike, with definitions that give greater context to the abbreviations and terms that are commonly used during gameplay. This gaming dictionary makes the gaming industry more accessible to non-gamers who want to understand what the gamers in their lives are interested in. At the same time, the accuracy of these definitions shows that Sony has an appreciation for the online communities and culture that gamers have cultivated around popular game franchises, giving a sense of validation to the gamers themselves.

In line with the Community Trend Pillar, consumers are drawn to like-minded individuals, organizations and brands. While brands will try to use slang terms to appear relatable, using these terms incorrectly can backfire and be seen as a cringe-worthy attempt to feign interest in what consumers are passionate about. Consumers will be more inclined to favor a brand that makes an authentic connection to their interests, making accuracy and a cautious use of contemporary pop culture references a key part of how brands can be part of a larger cultural conversation. For the gaming industry and other digital platforms, these terms can take on new meanings or change in importance at a moment’s notice, so brands that are able to keep up will be able to keep the attention of these consumers.

Kimberly Hernandez – Associate Analyst, Mintel Trends, North America

Easy-to-Drink Herbs-China

Herbal & Truth (草本趣时) is a start-up committed to developing new Chinese-style health supplements. The product line features traditional Chinese herbal medicine. For instance, the pod-shaped product named ‘Chinese Freeze-Dried Powder Capsule’ (人身活力小橙杯) uses ingredients including ginseng, goji, honeysuckle and dried orange peel without added sugar, claiming to help consumers ease tiredness and fatigue when staying up late. The brand aims to make preparing herbal supplements ‘as easy as preparing instant coffee pods’.

Young Chinese consumers are embracing commonly seen Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) ingredients like goji, ginseng, ejiao (donkey hide gelatin) and chrysanthemum to improve their health. As it’s not easy for today’s hectic young consumers to prepare time-consuming soup with raw materials such as ginseng like their parents or grandparents, quick-to-use, time-saving solutions are gaining favor. We’re seeing more brands launch TCM-inspired products with a modern twist to satisfy young consumers’ appetite for both health and convenience.

Consumers are interested not only in TCM’s ingredients but also its concepts, such as ‘Yang Sheng’, referring to ‘nourishing life’, and ‘holism’ that emphasizes the integrity of the human body and the close relationship between humans and surroundings. In the wake of the pandemic, brands can continue to take inspiration from traditional philosophy to meet consumers’ pursuit of holistic health. For instance, brands can encourage consumers to take care of mental status as part of total wellbeing, and incorporate their offerings into a slower lifestyle, which goes beyond simply promoting specific ingredients.


Victoria Li – Senior Analyst, Mintel Trends, China

Freelancing Social Matters- Argentina

Tu Freelo en Unilever is a program that Unilever launched in Argentina to encourage and support entrepreneurship among young adults.
Unilever, in partnership with Workana, will support recent graduates in obtaining experience working for large companies by hiring them as entrepreneurs to develop the company’s social campaigns. The work can be carried out remotely from anywhere in Argentina.

The pandemic has awakened not only a sense of entrepreneurship but also a willingness to contribute to programs, projects and charities that support the wellbeing of consumers and their communities. Many people who enjoyed the benefits of remote working during the pandemic are now dealing with another new normal as they either head back to the office or negotiate a new hybrid style of working that combines remote work with office-based work. However, a significant number of people have dared to start their own businesses, ultimately aiming to become their own bosses and avoid an overly structured working schedule. Companies are taking note of this shift and responding accordingly with programs such as that launched by Unilever, giving young adults an opportunity to become entrepreneurs but with the support of a large and experienced organization.

The age of entrepreneurship is upon us, and younger generations are daring to be independent without being put off by the potential risks involved. Needless to say, many still need guidance, education and financial backing from more knowledgeable companies. This need provides companies with an opportunity to start their own programs to support entrepreneurship as part of their CSR agendas. Providing this assistance will ensure that companies will be well received by consumers as they carry out their Ethics Checks, providing credibility and encouraging loyalty. Such schemes will also provide the companies themselves with a pool of potential freelance candidates who can provide them with fresh, daring and innovative ideas that appeal to the next generation.

Beatriz Monteiro – Associate Analyst, Mintel Trend, Latin America

Active Girls- United Kingdom

Big Sister is a new physical activity program funded by Women in Sport’s Tampon Tax Fund, wellness and leisure activity and wellness partner, Places Leisure, and Hey Girls, a social enterprise fighting to end period poverty. The initiative aims to help young girls maintain an exercise routine while navigating puberty, monthly periods and changing bodies. The community run for girls by girls aims to empower them to take ownership of their physical, mental and emotional health, as well as enhancing self-confidence and esteem. The new program also provides a platform for girls to voice their concerns about exercising and address the stigma surrounding menstruation, body image and judgment.

The Wellbeing Driver observes how consumers’ intentions to exercise have changed since the start of the pandemic, meaning brands will need to reconsider their approach to fitness. Weight loss was once the leading motivator, but now, with many adapting to a more holistic approach to fitness, they are motivated by how it will benefit their mental, physical and emotional health. In regards to menstruation, women experience different struggles while on their period such as cramps and fatigue. Brands would do well to recognize these concerns and offer more personalized fitness schedules at gyms, or even team up with wearable tech companies to help women take more control of their fitness while menstruating.

Narmada Sarvanantha – Analyst, Mintel Trends, Europe

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